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THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT

Vou. CII.

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1912 No. 1928

NEW VIADUCT, CHARLES RIVER EMBANKMENT, BOSTON MESSRS. PEABODY & STEARNS, CONSULTING ARCHITECTS

BOSTON ARCHITECTURAL CLUB EXHIBITION

OSTON is no exception to many of our cities in its lack of gallery space wherein to properly hang an architectural exhibition. To

be sure there are galleries for hire, con- trolled by private enterprise, where exhi- bitions iat be held, but the expense attending the use of these galleries is in most cases so great as to be beyond the means of societies organized to uplift vari- ous branches of the fine arts. In fact while we, as a nation, are proud of our artistic perceptions and ‘‘dote on art,” we are apt to draw our purse strings when the question of a contribution for a fine arts building is broached, and we go on from year to year doing the best we can to find an opportu- nity to display our architectural work in a manner befitting its dignity and impor- tance.

The Exhibition Committee of the Bos- ton Architectural Club were confronted with these conditions and it seemed at one time as if the projected exhibition would have to be abandoned. At the moment, however, when no rooms could be had that were within the means of the Club, the Art Committee of the Boston City Club, in a spirit of rare appreciation, offered its build- ing to the Architectural Club. Here was an opportunity finer than had even been hoped for. ‘The wall space was not only adequate, but the opportunity for architects to show their work to and interest a large and influential body of men, was unsur- passed. The City Club is composed of Boston’s representative business men. There in the large clubhouse they congregate each day, a thousand of them or more, and all about them is now spread the exhibition,

Copyright, 1912, by The American Architect

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THE AMERICAN

RESIDENCE OF MRS. F. L. W. RICHARDSON

MESSRS. RICHARDSON, BAROTT & RICHARDSON, ARCHITECTS

in such a way that it must be seen, and be- ing seen is appreciated. It is probable that few of this large body of men would take the time to seek out and visit an exhibition of this kind, but now we find them care-

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NATIONAL BANK BUILDING, SALEM, MASS. MESSRS. LITTLE & BROWN, ARCHITECTS

MERCHANTS’

fully studying it, discussing its merits from the business man’s standpoint and during evenings fraternizing with the architects who have achieved the results here shown. Let it not be inferred that the attendance at the exhibition is confined to members of the City Club. When they loaned their house, they also geaerously threw it open to the general public, and the result is an attendance such as few exhibitions have enjoyed. Further, the cause of good ar- chitecture is being daily advanced in the most satisfactory yay and everyone con- cerned is to be congratulated.

As to the exhibition, there is much to commend. We do not remember a simi- lar gathering of architectural work in recent

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years so diversified in its character. Domes- tic architecture has many times heretofore held so large a pr oportion of the wall space that the business building, ecclesiastical and collegiate work and other buildings that go to make the city and the town have received little attention.

RANDALL HALL, HARVARD COLLEGE MESSRS. WHEELWRIGHT & HAVEN, ARCHITECTS

The examples that make up this exhibi- tion have been selected with much judgment and artistic taste, and they are admirably supplemented by the c atalogue which con-

DETAIL OF ENTRANCE EPISCOPAL THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL LIBRARY, CAM- BRIDGE, MASS.

MESSRS. SHIPLEY, RUTAN & COOLIDGE, ARCHITECTS

THE AMERICAN

tains in many instances working drawings as a further illustration of the subjects exhibited. This feature is much to be commended. It affords the technical visi- tor an opportunity at his leisure to study with care subjects at the exhibition that have interested him. ‘The plan would seem to be a good one. If it is necessary on ac- count of limited wall space to omit the

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technical drawing, or if it is thought ad- visable—and this seems of late years to have been the judgment of committees, to make an exhibition that will interest the layman—to adhere largely to a pictorial representation—the technical man will find much satisfaction in this catalogue that so admirably supplements to him the interest aroused & the pictorial suggestion of the exhibition.

ARCHITECT

ENTRANCE GIRLS’ HIGH SCHOOL, BOSTON MESSRS. COOLIDGE & CARLSON, ARCHITECTS

Commercial Boston is growing apace and its business buildings already built and projected indicate that business men are beginning to appreciate the value of good architecture. With such structures as the Columbian Life Building, the Minot Building, the Chickering Building and many other excellent examples, shown at this exhibition, the artistic growth of the city in its business district becomes assured. It affords an opportunity to appreciate the

A HOUSE IN NEWTON, MASS. MESSRS. NEWHALL & BLEVINS, ARCHITECTS

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THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT

BUILDING FOR BOSTON METROPOLITAN PARK COMMISSION

MR. WILLIAM DOWNS AUSTIN, ARCHITECT

part that architects take in these days in the esthetic development of cities, and how the” work of the profession is leading to higher and better ideals, that part of the community that it has been customary to regard as sordid and only affected in its enthusiasm by the stresses of trade and barter.

To specifically note in a critical way the various exhibits at the City Club would be, within the space available, impossible.

DETAIL OF PARK BUILDING FOR BOSTON METRO- POLITAN PARK COMMISSION MR. WILLIAM DOWNS AUSTIN, ARCHITECT

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Every frame presents its contribution of interest. To the man in practice the work appeals in a way to arouse enthusiasm and merit the praise that the true artist always accords to good art. In it the student

DOORWAY OF A HOUSE, TAUNTON, MASS. MESSRS. PARKER, THOMAS & RICE, ARCHITECTS

finds much to make him thoughtful and stimulate his efforts; and the busy man, as already noted, finds time to study. In short, the general public made up of all these and others seems to evince a healthy and genuine interest in the pictures which goes to prove what we have been trying to point out, that it is a very good exhibition, and one that will undoubtedly result in much benefit to the community and the profession alike.

THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT

1911-1912 ERNEST FLAGG A. B. TROWBRIDGE PRESIDENT RecorDING SECRETARY 109 Broad St. 114 E. 28th St.

WILLIAM EMERSON MAURICE PREVOT CHAIRMAN COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION CoRRESPONDING SECRETARY

281 Fifth Avenue. 115 E. 30th St.

LLOYD WARREN GEORGE S. CHAPPELL CHAIRMAN Paris Prizg ComMMITTEE Vice PRESIDENT 3 E. 33d St. 345 Fifth Ave.

F. H. BOSWORTH, Jr., Treasurer, 1170 Broadway, New York.

REPORT OF THE JURY CLASS “A”—I PROJET (Problem in Design)

“A Crry RESIDENCE”

If more students had frankly departed

from the symmetrical solution of this prob- lem the grade of work would have been

much higher and the students would have derived greater benefit from this excellent programme. As it*was the medals all went to the unsymmetrical solutions.

It is not out of place at the beginning of the term to call attention to the necessity of students spending more time on their original sketches. They seem to think that they can hand in any sort of work at the outset and trust to their teachers to pull them out of trouble later. This is the wrong attitude and is strongly discouraged by the Committee on Education.

Students may also be interested in know- ing that this is the first judgment in which the names of all competitors have been covered before the time of judgment. This practice will be followed hereafter.

WARREN PRIZE COMPETITION “A Movine Picture EstaBLISHMENT”

The evident desirability of some sepa- ration between the publication and manu- facturing parts of this Moving Picture

C. W. STEDMAN,

FIRST PRIZE,

.U. OF PENN. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

A MOVING PICTURE ESTABLISHMENT

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THIRD MEDAL W. C. STANTON, PHILADELPHIA ATELIER, UNIV. OF PENNA.

Plant called for in the Warren Prize Pro- gramme caused the most marked difficulty in securing a solution of the problem.

Only one really good solution was pre- sented, that of C. ‘W. Stedman, receiving first prize. Here the desired separation was shown without interfering with the effective relation of the two essential parts of the problem.

There was no objection by the jury to an unsymmetrical solution of the problem but none of those presented met the condi- tions satisfactorily.

OFFICIAL NOTIFICATION TO S.B.

A.A. STUDENTS OF AWARDS MADE

IN THE JUDGMENT OF NOVEMBER 19TH, 1912

The Committee on Education in New York and its Local Committee in San Francisco received 107 Esquisses (Prelim- inary Sketches) and 70 Projets Rendus (Sets of Final Drawings) in the

CLASS “A”’—I PROJET (Problem in Design)

A City RESIDENCE

Author Award Atelier City Stedman, C. W..... Ist Medal U. of P. S. of Archt.Phila. Barney, J. P....... Ist Medal . .

. Ist Medal Columbia U niversity, N. Y. City Shenfield, "L. L..... 2d Medal i Hough, W. J. H.... 2d Medal U. of P. S. of Archt., Phila. The following students received “Mentions”: Atelier Bennett- Rebori, C hicago: R. Wolff; Boston Archtl. Club, Boston: W. L. Smith; Carnegie Tech. Schs., Pittsburgh: M. Jones, L. H. Pers- ley, A. N. Steinmark, J. B. Hays, F. C. Disque, L. C. Dillen- back, J. V. Wilson, A. H. Good; Cincinnati Archtl. Club, Cincin-

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nati: C. R. Strong; Columbia University, N. Y. City: L. B. Hues- mann, H. V. Schwanenfleugel, W. Hesse, A. H. Knappe, E. F. Fanning, J. J. Ide, H. B. Brainerd, W. Simmons, P. 'T. Shutze, "ig J. Mead, O. R. Koechl, W. L. Risley, E. St. J. Griffith,

). Freudenfels; F. N. Eremson Atelier, Peoria, Ill.: A. B. Dunham; nae eae N. Y. City: C. W. Conway, C. E. Fetherston, G. Holland; Phila. Atelier, U. of P., Philadelphia: F. W. Hauptle, F. A. Muhlenberg; Atelier Swales, Montreal: H. Sternfeld, J. H. Taylor; Univ. of Pa., School of Archt., Philadelphia: W. C. bay S. A. Love, Jr.; Atelier Wie N. Y. City: L. J. Barrett,

ae Kleem: un, a Fentnor, F. C. Van Name; Atelier Brown, S F. A. C., San Francisco: C. IL Warnecke, TH. F. Burditt; ag? of California, San Francisco: S. L. Jory, G. E. Comfort, A. Jory.

The Committee on Education in New York and its Local Committee in San Fran- cisco received 52 Sketches in the

CLASS “A’—I ESQUISSE-ESQUISSE (Rendered Sketch)

“An HistoricaL TABLET’

Author Award Atelier City Stanton, e - . 3d Medal Phila. Atel. U. of P., Phila. Knight, F. ... Mention Bir. Soc. of Archts., Birmingham. Flawn, Ss. ¢ - Brown, S. F. A. C., San Francisco

McCullough, H. M.. Wilson, J. V. Ais Jones, M........

Stanton, J. E.. .

Carnegie Tech. Schs. , Pittsburgh

c/o Warren & Wetmore, N.Y.City

The Committee on Education in New York and its Local Committee in San Fran- cisco received 125 Sketches in the

CLASS “B’—I ESQUISSE-ESQUISSE (Rendered Sketch)

*A ZooLoGicAL MusEuM”

Author Award Atelier City Brugger, J. T... Ist Men. Phila. Atel. U. of P., Philadelphia Schene, L. H.... Mention Columbia Univ., N. Y. City. Morgan, L.. 5 si Hirons, N. Y. City.

Dunham, P. C.. - i ? Wigham, FE. H. Phila., Atel. U. of P.,Philadelphia

The Committee on Education in New York received 52 Sketches in the

WARREN PRIZE COMPETITION

offered for general excellence in planning a group of buildings. First Place, $50. Second Prize, $25. The Prize is the gift of Messrs. Whitney and Lloyd Warren.

“A Movine Picrure EstTaBLISHMENT”’

Author Award Atelier City Stedman, C. W..... Ist Prize U. of P. Sch. of Arch., Philadel. Schulz, P......... 2d Prize Columbia University, N. Y. City

The following students received “Mentions” for which no val- ues are awarded:—Columbia Univ., N. Y. City; P. T. Shutze; Phila. Atel., U. of P., Phila.: E. H. Wigham, Atelier Ware, N.Y. City: R. M. Johnson.

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THE AMERICAN

THEAMERICANARCHITECT Founded 1876 PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY BY THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT (INC.) No. 50 Union Square, New York (Fourth Avenue and 17th Street)

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Von. CII DECEMBER 4, 1912 No. 1928

PRETENDERS IN THE PROFESSIONS [: is probably impossible for any profes-

sion or calling to entirely purge itself of parasites and impostors who in the first instance attach themselves to it and extract a more or less precarious living from a part of the main structure not readily reached or perfectly protected and in the second, prey upon the public direct. ‘The medical profession, for example, has_ its uacks of two principal varieties: First, these who undertake to furnish assistance to timid or uncertain members; second, those who make their appeal to afflicted and suffering humanity. And when we consider the law we find the Bar Associa- tion busy with cases of unprofessional prac- tice and illegal efforts of “shysters’ and quondam attorneys no longer entitled to confidence. Even the ministry is obliged from time to time to take action against men whose connection with and activities in the church discredit the calling. Under these circumstances, it is not per- haps surprising that we have had jour atten- tion called to a number of instances of unprofessional architectural practices that have apparently been flourishing to some ex- tent during recent months. One of these finds expression in the form of a photogra- phic company, which offers to supply archi- tects with plans, photographs, details, etc., at a nominal figure, conveniently providing

ARCHITECT

a place in which the architect making use of the “service” can place his own name and so fulfill his client’s requirements with practically no expense to his own office. Another consists of a circular issued by a concern designated as ‘architects and engi- neers,’ and the proposal is made to furnish “unparalleled professional architectural ser- vices at half the standard charges.” Still a third instance claiming attention is that of an architect (?) who is making use of the plans drawn by a reputable member of the profession to secure work from clients requiring similar buildings. The plan of operation includes the erection of a building in accordance with the plans selected as nearly as he can interpret them, with an obvious saving in cost to himself and a re- puted saving to client.

Of course, denunciation of these practices is superfluous among reputable members of the profession. ‘They are simply the manifestations of a condition that has no doubt existed to an even greater extent in former years than at present and our at- tention is attracted to it more by reason of the methods used by these outlaws to secure victims than by any increase of unprofes- sional practice.

The problem, while not a new one, seems to be how this sort of “practitioner” can be effectually suppressed. Obviously the con- trol of the variety which lives on the pro- fession, itself, lies with the profession.

If members generally would refuse to make use of the services offered, would take every opportunity to discourage the prac- tice, and would in fact adopt active measures to eradicate it rather than passively submit to, or ignore its irritations, an end would be put to it in short order.

As to those who masquerade as archi- tects and prey upon the public, the ~ pression of their activities is not so easily accomplished. An apparent solution of this phase of the problem lies in the educa- tion of the public to a point where it will not longer be deceived. ‘This work seems to be going forward under the direction of the American Institute, and it is hoped that it will be added to and amplified until a general understanding by the masses of the questions involved will make it impos- sible for any but competent, reputable archi- tects to enjoy the confidence or commission

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of any owner requiring architectural service. It would also seem of advantage to accom- pany and supplement this educational work with persistent efforts to secure the enact- ment of uniform legislation throughout the country fixing proper standards for ad- mittance to a profession upon the wise and safe practice of which our future develop- ment to a very large degree depends.

RESPECT FOR GOOD ARCHITEC- TURE

IGNIFICANT of the growing appre- S ciation of good architecture and_ its

value, particularly when associated with historic tradition, are-recently published ar- ticles in Baltimore papers protesting against the demolition of one of the earlier school houses in Baltimore, to prepare the way for a more modern structure. <A_ protest by a number of members of the profession against the razing of the building, which they state is a unique example of good archi- tecture and one in which the city should take pride, is strongly endorsed by the press.

It is wisely held that “Baltimore is not so rich in art or architecture that it can afford to sacrifice things which the best opinion urges it to keep.”

Thoughtful men of artistic perception will agree with this statement, not alone as ap- plied to Baltimore but to every city in this country. The rapid growth of certain sec- tions in our larger cities is causing the tear- ing down of good architecture which is re- —, unfortunately, with much that is put little better than mediocre. Such con- dition is however to a degree inevitable and probably cannot be wholly checked. Progress in municipal growth may not be denied, even when it marks the passing of the good in architecture in certain instances, but it is worthy of note that, as in a number of recent cases, the public conscience has been quickened by an appreciation of art acquired in the last decade till few oppor- tunities are now omitted by the people. to stay the hand of the wrecker where pos- sible and conserve the good in architecture whenever it can be reasonably and wisely done.

ANGLO-MANIA IN ARCHITECTU- RAL JOURNALISM REBUKED BY AN ENGLISH CONTEMPORARY

Even at the risk of being again criticized by our esteemed friend and _ co-worker, The Architectural Review of Boston, we cannot refrain from “clipping” a owe graph from The Architects’ and Builders’ Journal of London. Of course, this “‘clip- ping” habit can be overdone, and no doubt we have at times quoted material from other journals that was not of especial interest, particularly to The Architectural Review, but if such is the case we trust the following excerpt will not be considered another such instance. It reads:

Ihave just come across a sentence in the Architectural Review of Boston which makes one tingle with elation. For here we find—passing strange—something being said in praise of our own work. We have long since become accustomed to hear how much better they do

200

these things in France, and to learn, within recent years, how poor our own architectural efforts are in compari- son with what is being done in the States. It is nothing less than a shock, then, to read the following in a review of current architecture periodicals: “No one can follow the English magazines month after month without being impressed by the great variety of the work done in that country, and also by the frequent recurrence of designs of a more original and virile type than seems to be produced in American offices.” Is this merely another instance of the prophet not being without honour save in his own country, or are we really doing better work than we are accustomed to believe? Have American architects had a surfeit of Letarouilly, and are they satiated with the baths of the Romans?—so that our own buildings, based on no such grand models, have a more “original” and “virile” appearance? There may be a germ of truth in that suggestion, but the whole truth lies, I fear, in less happy relation to ourselves. Except in domestic work, we are a long way below the American achievement, and the writer re- ferred to would find it as difficult to substantiate his opinion by any large selection of contemporary civic work in this country as he would find it difficult to get American colleagues to confirm his own views on the subject.

THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT

VOL. CII, NO. 1928 DECEMBER 4, 1912

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MINOT BUILDING, BOSTON, MASS. i

MESSRS. PARKER, THOMAS & RICE, ARCHITECTS \

EXHIBITION OF BOSTON ARCHITECTURAL CLUB

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THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT

VOL. CII, NO. 1928 DECEMBER 4, 1912

VILLA LATOMIA, EASTERN POINT, GLOUCESTER, MASS. MESSRS. LITTLE & BROWN, ARCHITECTS

EXHIBITION OF BOSTON ARCHITECTURAL CLUB

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VOL. CII, NO. 1928 DECEMBER 4, 1912

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EXHIBITION OF BOSTON ARCHITECTURAL CLUB

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VOL. CII, NO. 1928

THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT

DECEMBER 4, 1912

SKETCH OF TOWER OF PERKINS INSTITUTE WATERTOWN, MASS. MR. R. CLIPSTON STURGIS, ARCHITECT

EXHIBITION OF BOSTON ARCHITECTURAL CLUB

THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT

VOL. CII, NO. 1928 DECEMBER 4, 1912

TEMPLE IN GARDEN OF THE HON. LARZ ANDERSON BROOKLINE, MASS. MESSRS. LITTLE & BROWN, ARCHITECTS

EXHIBITION OF BOSTON ARCHITECTURAL CLUB

THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT

VOL. CII, NO. 1928 DECEMBER 4, 1912

STAIRWAY IN HOUSE OF MRS. F. L. W. RICHARDSON | MESSRS. RICHARDSON, BAROTT & RICHARDSON, ARCHITECTS

EXHIBITION OF BOSTON ARCHITECTURAL CLUB

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